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HomeNewsEUROPEUnveiling Austria's Corporate Sleuths: Private Eyes on Sick Leave

Unveiling Austria’s Corporate Sleuths: Private Eyes on Sick Leave

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In the picturesque landscapes of Austria, where tradition and modernity intersect, a unique and somewhat controversial practice is gaining traction among employers. Forget the conventional sick leave policies; Austrian businesses are turning to an unexpected ally to ensure their workforce stays true to their recuperative downtime – private detectives.

In a country where employees enjoy up to six weeks of paid sick leave, the dynamics of monitoring health-related absences take an intriguing turn. While trust prevails, some employers, guided by a provision in the Trade Regulation Act, are exercising their right to “sick leave monitoring” based on a purported “legitimate interest.”

Unlike the traditional skepticism of verifying sickness claims, the intent here is not merely to catch an employee in a lie but to assess if their actions during sick leave could impede the recovery process. Enter private detectives, the unsung heroes of this clandestine pursuit.

Ditectives watching over sick leavers

Reports suggest that companies are increasingly enlisting the services of these covert professionals, with sick leave monitoring constituting a staggering 40 percent of their investigative requests. Wien Heute, in a riveting expose, shadowed a pair of detectives armed with binoculars, a stakeout van straight out of a noir film, and high-tech recording equipment.

Their mission: to tail an employee mandated to stay home under doctor’s orders. What unfolds is a real-life drama, complete with visits to an ice cream parlor and a public pool in Vienna. Every move meticulously documented, these private eyes work in tandem – one stationed in the van, the other on foot – capturing the supposed offender’s every move.

The stakes are high, not just for the employee facing potential job loss but also the prospect of footing the bill for these modern-day sherlocks. A final dossier, a compilation of undeniable evidence, lands on the employer’s desk, leaving the employee in a precarious position.

In a country where the relationship between citizens and their family doctors is intimate, this departure into the realm of surveillance is raising eyebrows. The question echoing through the Austrian labor landscape is clear: How far is too far when it comes to ensuring sick leave integrity?

As we navigate the intricate dance between trust and scrutiny in the Austrian workplace, one can’t help but ponder the implications of this growing reliance on private detectives. Are we witnessing a necessary evolution in employer-employee dynamics, or is this a slippery slope into a world where every sick day comes under the watchful eye of a detective’s lens? The answers, it seems, are as elusive as the detectives themselves.


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